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Readers Respond: Tips For Taking Showers At Camp

Responses: 8

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Not all campgrounds have showers, in which case you can improvise with a shower bag. Campgrounds that provide hot (or even cold) showers can be a real treat. Problems often encountered include low water pressure, no hot water, no privacy or not cleaned regularly. Do you have any advice for taking showers at the campground?           

Showers at Campsites

Showering at camgrounds can be challenging, no doubt. Some campgrounds have public showers but are often busy when there are family members and kids about. Some campgrounds, especially state type, now do not allow anything hanging fastened to trees besides say a garbage bag from a lower branch to keep it off the ground and away from critters. We make frequent trips to dumpsters to empty to discourage pests and hungry visitors. Showering can be a challenge for simple, spur of the moment weekend campers! Also how about idea and tip forum on this as well as camping packing tips, backpacking tips how to pack that backpack say for 3 or 4 days and nights! Any women agree with me on these challenges out there? We used to be Cabin campers and now are mostly tent campers its easiier to be spontaneous and just load everything up and go or leave it in the truck and just add what's needed! Arguments have ensued about what and how to pack though! Campsites visited usually have fire pits and tables.
—Guest naturelove

Camp shower

I made a free standing shower with PVC pipe. Just fit it together and cover with a plastic tarp held in place with a couple of bungees. It all fits inside an army duffel bag.
—Guest Tim

Texsport Camp Shower

I bought a Texsport Camp Shower for $25 that included a 5-gallon shower bag. The shower consists of polyethylene walls attached to a 30" square frame that you hang from a tree. Guylines hold the walls out so you don't rub up against them while showering. No more waiting in line to take a shower at the campground.
—Guest Joseph

Battery Powered Shower Pump

I've tried those bags and they are great for heating the water. However, trying to lift and secure them in order to take a shower can be daunting. A friend found a battery powered shower pump at Target. Bought one and used it last weekend. Excellent!! We heated the water in the black shower bags, dumped the warm water into a five gallon bucket and 3 people took showers. With this battery shower, you immerse the pump in the water and all you have to hold is the sprayer.
—Guest Cheryl

Flip-flops

I just checked out your shower essentials list and you forgot an item. It is flip-flops or those little rubber thongs you wear on your feet. My mom always told me if I took showers in public places to always wear those. In our camper we always keep 3 or 4 pairs in there just for that. Just thought you'd like to know.
—Guest Meg

Gear Bucket

Instead of a waterproof bag to carry your gear in, try a five gallon or smaller bucket with a snap tight lid on it. You can put everything you need for a shower in them, and put them on the floor if need be (no seat or seat too small) and everything stays dry. You can use them for a foot prop also to dry your feet before putting on your shoes, and you can store your shower essentials in them full time between trips (mine is always in the bathroom closet!) Also, if you run into a line at the showers (has happened to me) they make great seats while you wait! I used to use a bag until one year when I went to Cornerstone Music Festival with some friends and they showed me this tip! So handy, and it stores great in the camping gear! I've used my square kitty litter bucket now for five years. Another tip is to use the camping shower bag not only to heat up water to bathe with, but also to just keep some hot water on hand for little cleanups, dishes, starting water for boiling, etc.
—Guest Terry

Shaving Suggestion

My personal commentary on the razor is don't. I've come back from camping trips - both Scouts and family - with swimmer's itch (parasites from ducks, etc). I often wondered why the troop or my family (of males) didn't get it when they swam in the same water. Well, this vane female finally figured it out. I bring a razor to shave my legs (I'm learning to grow up and realize it doesn't matter) - this leaves open ground for parasite and microbes to infest (even if you shower). Given that I'm a medical micro-biologist by profession this should have hit me in the head before I was itchy. For that reason, I'd take the razor off the list.
—Guest Plantsitter

Coffee Maker Water Heater

For those who tent camp or those who have a pop-up trailer/tent trailer (without a water heater) that would like to have hot water available without heating it up over a stove or campfire, they can use a 30 cup automatic coffee maker. I saw one at a garage sale and the lady having the garage sale asked if I camped (I had a "Happy Camper" t-shirt on that day) and I told her yes. She asked how we camped and I told her we had a pop-up and she proceeded to tell me that a coffee maker of that size worked really nice for having hot water at the campsite (if you had a site with electricity). So I bought it from her and she was right. I had hot water available all day for whatever and whenever I needed it. My husband "groans" sometimes when I stop at garage sales but even he admitted that this is one of my better purchases. We now have a travel trailer and no use for the coffeemaker so I'm passing it along to another family in the group that we go camping with. They are tent campers.
—Guest Meg

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